The Inner Wolf Howl | Equipment reviews, Events and Activities for You and Your Dogs | Canicross | Bikejor | Camping

  • DAX Scooter - Available NOW - Be the first to own the latest in dog scooters!!

    The New 2010 DAX Scooter with full suspension and disk brakes is the next generation of the DAX Scooters and  in dog scooter design. Easy to dismantle and assemble for simple transport and storage. Scootering is a growing sport in this country not only for racing huskies, and other sled dogs, but also for the dog enthusiast who wants to exercise and have fun with their pets. Anyone can do it with almost any dog. Scootering is an ideal way to exercise dogs that have a tendency to pull.

    Dax Scooter

    The

    For many dogs our walking or running speed is just too slow for them and they need something extra. Scootering is a safe and controlled means of keeping up with your fast and exercise hungry dogs, allowing them to run as a team to burn off their excess energy. The size of many commercial, three wheeled 'Rigs' can cause problems for storage and transportation. To combat these issues and to open the sport up to the weekend enthusiast, we've developed a 'Mini-Rig' - A foldable, compact, light weight (14.6Kg), easily maintained version - 'Dax-Scooter' This innovative folding design has good ground clearance, frame and fork suspension, great stability disk brakes and obviously compacts to be stored or transported. Features:
    • Folding Frame and Stem, for easy transport and storage
    • Lightweight, only 14.6Kg
    • Frame damper and Suspension Forks (50mm travel) to help make rough terrain smooth
    • BMX style handle bar & Grips
    • 180mm Mechanical Disk brakes
    • 20" Quick Release Wheels
    • Deck with Black grip tape covering
    • Quick Release Stainless steel ‘Brush-Bow'.

    The removable Brush-Bow is a stainless steel ‘wheel-guard’. This essential addition to the design provides a safe and secure means by which to attach your dogs to the scooter in an attempt to avoid those nasty high speed tug-line wrapped wheel scenarios. It is also easily detached for free-style fun and tricks Watch this space for more information, tips and demos on dog scootering. Follow this link to see more. http://www.innerwolf.co.uk/scooters-rigs-mushing/dax-scooter.html AVAILABLE NOW! Watch this space for pictures and footage of the scooters in action!

  • Brocks Hill Doggie Day, 4th July, 11am - 3.30pm

    Join us at the Brocks Hill Doggie Day, organised by the Wigston Magna Dog Training Club. Doggie Day & Fun Dog Show is celebrating responsible dog ownership. There will be a fun dog show £1 per entry, entry to the come a watch is FREE.  Various show classes, including: handsomest dog, waggiest tail, best veteran and more... There will be a fun mini agility course, trail round the park and meet the Pets as Therapy Dogs. All monies raised will be donated to the Derbyshire Leicestershire and Rutland Air Ambulance, http://www.dlraa.co.uk/ Brock Hill Country Park is locate on Washbrook Lane, Oadby, off Wigston Lane. It'll be a great day, and the weather forecast is good!

  • Beacon Hill 5 Mile Trail Run, 18th June 7pm. Leicestershire

    This might not be everyone’s idea of a way to spend a Friday evening, especially when there is an Engalnd World Cup match on, but from the reports there wasn’t a great deal missed there, although it did have an affect on the turn out.       The weather was ideal for running. Not too cold and not too warm.  Beacon Hill Country Park is a fantastic setting and Wow! what a view when you get to the top.  The run starts with a slow 1 mile climb winding through the tree cover, before this opens up near the top of the beacon. This is were us slower runners quickly fall behind  For the first half mile Sam, black lab, decided that he would pull but soon thought better of it has the incline steepened, thank you Sam. Upon reaching the view across North Leicestershire is quite breathtaking, or was that the 1 mile climb?? Probably a bit of both. And then there is the downhill. Now Sam decides to pull. I flew down. On a couple of occasions I felt like I had to run with the brakes on, which takes more out of you than you think. The course then looped round back to near the start line before a sharp right turn and another long slow incline. It this point Sam is back running beside me. No. Sam, go on, PULL! Just up ahead there was another canicrosser, who I had pulled back a bit of ground on the downhill, and I thought if I could stay close on this hill then there has to be another downhill coming were I could go past. But, with her little Staffie pulling like a freight train and Sam’s nose now engaged the gap slowly increased as my legs steadily tired. At this point a few runners went past me. The course then passes near to the top of the beacon again. Another outstanding view! And a chance to get your breathe back. The field had now really opened out and I found a nice steady pace. Time to just enjoy it with a nice steady downhill before taking to more tree cover and then the last of the uphill’s, a couple more runners went past on this hill - I must do more hill training - before another steady mile downhill the finish. Then through the trees I could hear a few shouts, those welcome signs that the finish is not far away. I check the Garmin and it showed that I’d cover around 4.5 miles. So with only half a mile to go I picked up the pace, hoping that Sam was going to help out at this point too, but he decided again that running next to me was the better option. Crossing the finish line felt very good indeed. There were already a fair few runners there to cheer the other runners home.  My finish time was 45.53min which is better than I expected to do. I haven’t run 5 miles for some time so to finish it and at that pace felt good. I’m not sure if my body is quite agreeing with that now as I type this.   I’d like to say a big thank you to the race organisers, www.purepersonaltraining.co.uk, check out their website for more events, and the race sponsor’s, www.upandrunning.co.uk for what was all round a great event and a very good way to spend a Friday evening. I’ll be doing it again. Equipment used; Sam, Ruffwear Webmaster Harness Skijor Now Waist belt and line Me, Asics Gel Landreth 5 (from Leicester Running Shop, Claredon Park)

  • Kuranda – the chewproof raised dog bed.

    There are not many beds, if any, that can claim to be truly chewproof. We all know as dog owners that nothing can withstand those jaws if a dog really wants to get their teeth into something. The Kuranda dog bed is a chewproof bed. Designed with no real egdes that the dog can get their teeth into. The beds unique design tucks the fabric panel inside a poly resin or aluminium frame - safely hidden away. The Kuranda beds have taken the US by storm with a large number of kennels, rehoming centres and breeders using the Kuranda beds. Because of their toughness and versititly they outlast all other beds.  The Kuranda bed is manufactured from either a tough PVC or alumunium frame for strength but remain lightweight. They are very easy to assemble making them ideal for storage or to stow in the boot when going on trips away. Suitable for both indoor or outdoor use.

    Kuranda_Raised_Beds

    Chewproof

    The elevated position keeps the dog away from drafts or the cold ground when on a camping trip or at home in the winter. They are available ni a range of sizes frmm toy dog to extra large dogs. The frames can even stack to create bunkbeds if space is at a premium.   If your dog does manage somehow to get their teeth into any part of the bed then Kuranda are happy to replace the part for you. You can’t ask for fairer then that!
    Kuranda Aluminium Raised Bed

    See them online at www.innerwolf.co.uk/gbu0-prodshow/Kuranda_Poly_Bed.html

  • DAX Scooter - Available for delivery the last week in July 2010 (updated) - Be the first to own the latest in dog scooters!!

    At Inner Wolf we are proud to announce that we will be a stockist of the new DAX Scooter. The New 2010 DAX Scooter with full suspension and disk brakes is the next generation of the DAX Scooters and  in dog scooter design. Easy to dismantle and assemble for simple transport and storage. Scootering is a growing sport in this country not only for racing huskies, and other sled dogs, but also for the dog enthusiast who wants to exercise and have fun with their pets. Anyone can do it with almost any dog. Scootering ideal way to exercise dogs that have a tendancy to pull. Dax Scooter For many dogs our walking or running speed is just too slow for them and they need something extra. Scootering is a safe and controlled means of keeping up with your fast and exercise hungry dogs, allowing them to run as a team to burn off their excess energy. The size of many commercial, three wheeled 'Rigs' can cause problems for storage and transportation. To combat these issues and to open the sport up to the weekend enthusiast, we've developed a 'Mini-Rig' - A foldable, compact, light weight (14.6Kg), easily maintained version - 'Dax-Scooter' This innovative folding design has good ground clearance, frame and fork suspension, great stability disk brakes and obviously compacts to be stored or transported. Features:

    • Folding Frame and Stem, for easy transport and storage
    • Lightweight, only 14.6Kg
    • Frame damper and Suspension Forks (50mm travel) to help make rough terrain smooth
    • BMX style handle bar & Grips
    • 180mm Mechanical Disk brakes
    • 20" Quick Release Wheels
    • Deck with Black grip tape covering
    • Quick Release Stainless steel ‘Brush-Bow'.

      The removable Brush-Bow is a stainless steel ‘wheel-guard’. This essential addition to the design provides a safe and secure means by which to attach your dogs to the scooter in an attempt to avoid those nasty high speed tug-line wrapped wheel scenarios. It is also easily detached for free-style fun and tricks Watch this space for more information, tips and demos on dog scootering. Follow this link to see more. http://www.innerwolf.co.uk/scooters-rigs-mushing/dax-scooter.html AVAILABILITY UPDATE: We have just received word that there unfortunately has been a slight delay with manufacture and the DAX Scooter will be available for dispatch W/C 12th July '10.

  • Heat Stroke in Dogs

    With the weather now starting the warm-up, well for the moment anyway, and with a potentially hot summer forecast heat stroke can be a serious problem for many dogs.

    Dogs Overheat in cars

    Dogs

    Hyperthermia is an elevation in body temperature. This increase typically occurs as a response to a trigger, such as inflammation in the body or a hot environment. When a dog is exposed to high temperatures, heat stroke or heat exhaustion can result. Heat stroke is a very serious condition that requires immediate medical attention. Once the signs of heat stroke are detected, there is precious little time before serious damage - or even death - can occur. Dogs do not sweat through their skin like humans - they release heat primarily by panting and they sweat through the foot pads and nose. If a dog cannot effectively expel heat, the internal body temperature begins to rise. Once the dog's temperature reaches 41°C, damage to the body's cellular system and organs may become irreversible. Unfortunately, too many dogs succumb to heat stroke when it could have been avoided. Learn how to recognise the signs of heat stroke and prevent it from happening to your dog. Signs of Heat Stroke The following signs may indicate heat stroke in a dog:
    • Increased rectal temperature (over 40°C requires action, over 41°C is a dire emergency)
    • Vigorous panting
    • Dark red gums
    • Tacky or dry mucus membranes (specifically the gums)
    • Lying down and unwilling (or unable) to get up
    • Collapse and/or loss of consciousness
    • Thick saliva
    • Dizziness or disorientation

    What to do if You Suspect Heat Stroke If you have even the slightest suspicion that your dog is suffering from heat stoke, you must take immediate action.

    1. First, move your dog out of the heat and away from the sun right away.
    2. Begin cooling your dog by placing cool, wet rags or washcloths on the body - especially the foot pads and around the head.
    3. DO NOT use ice or very cold water! Extreme cold can cause the blood vessels to constrict, preventing the body's core from cooling and actually causing the internal temperature to further rise. In addition, over-cooling can cause hypothermia, introducing a host of new problems. When the body temperature reaches 39°C, stop cooling.
    4. Offer your dog cool water, but do not force water into your dog's mouth.
    5. Call or visit your vet right away - even if your dog seems better. Internal damage might not be obvious to the naked eye, so an exam is necessary (and further testing may be recommended).

    Tip: recruit others to help you - ask someone to call the vet while others help you cool your dog. Preventing Heat Stroke There are ways you can prevent heat stroke from happening in the first place.

    • NEVER leave your dog alone in the car on a warm day, regardless of whether the windows are open. Even if the weather outside is not extremely hot, the inside of the car acts like an oven - temperatures can rise to dangerously high levels in a matter of minutes.
    • Avoid vigorous exercise on warm days. When outside, opt for shady areas.
    • Keep fresh cool water available at all times.
    • Certain types of dogs are more sensitive to heat - especially obese dogs and brachycephalic (short-nosed) breeds, like Pugs and Bulldogs. Use extreme caution when these dogs are exposed to heat.

    Some dogs can recover fully from heat stroke if it is caught early enough. Others suffer permanent organ damage and require lifelong treatment. Sadly, many dogs do not survive heat stroke. Prevention is the key to keeping your dog safe during warmer weather. By Jenna Stregowski, RVT To help your dog cope with the heat try the Ruffwear Swamp Cooler

  • Inner Wolf Open Day, 24th April 10am - 3pm

     We would like to invite you along to our Open Day on the 24th April 10am - 3pm. Of course dogs are welcome too. Inner Wolf Open Day, 24th April With our relocation to new premises in Wigston and our ever expanding range of products we would like to take this opportunity for you to drop in and take a look at our product range, try them on and give them a go. Expert advice will be on hand to help out with any questions you may have about the equipment or any activities you might be looking to take part in. As dog owners ourselves we are keen to encourage a active lifestyle to keep us all in shape. Our range of equipment reflects this allowing you to take part in, or discover new, activities with your dog. Whether you looking to go running with your dog, cycling, hiking or camping we have the equipment you need to take your dog along too. We are easy to find in Wigston. Mowsley End is located off Bull Head Street (A5199) with Kwik-Fit on the corner. For further information please cal on 0845 602 3564. Location: Inner Wolf, 2 Mowsley End, Wigston, Leics, LE18 3LS. If you are unable to make it to the open day we are also open Monday - Friday 9am - 5pm, please drop in.

  • The NEW WalkyBasket

    Gone are the days of the wicker basket on the front of the bike. The new WalkyBasket is following in the foot steps of the extremely popular WalkyDog bike attachment. Now you can have your large dog safely trotting alongside you on your bike and your small dog enjoying the ride. The WalkyBasket is the perfect accessory for taking your dog with you on your bike or giving your dog a rest between runs on the WalkyDog. It attaches quickly and easily to the handlebars using a quick-release fitting system. It can be easily removed from your bike using the quick-release system and includes a padded strap so you can also carry it on your shoulder. Your dog is safe and comfortable in the WalkyBasket and can join you on all of your bike treks.

    WalkyBasket™ ... just add the dog!
    • made from strong, water resistant 600 Denier woven polyester 'canvas' fabric, with PVC backing
    • removable mesh top
    • also includes a water resistant removable lid
    • two mesh pockets on the side and a front zipped pocket so you can carry small items that your dog may need
    • your dog can be secured inside with the inner leash
    • a soft cushioned base
    • a reflective front band for increased safety
    • easily foldable

    Specifications:

    • Approximate size: 40cm L x 33cm W x 25cm H (15.7" x 13" x 10")
    • Recommended for cats and smaller breeds of dogs such as Yorkshire Terriers, Bichon Frise and Chihuauas. It is equally suitable for carrying other items when your dog is not in it.

    The WalkyBasket is now in stock. It is listed on the website at; http://www.innerwolf.co.uk/cycling-bikejoring/walkybasket.html

  • Running with your dog.

    What a way for you both to keep fit and loose a bit of podge! With the recent rise in the number of reported obese pets it is an effective way to ensure your dog stays in shape. Also with many behavioural caused by excessive energy a tied out dog won’t try to find was to expell the energy. Many people are put off by the idea of running because it can be a little monotonous and lonley but having your dog run with you will turn it into a more fun experience. If you are considering taking your dog running with you then a good way to start is the obvious way, running with the dog along side you on a lead. Your dog’s fitness does have limitaions, just as yours will. Therefore you will need to build up fitness levels so take it easy for both your sakes. Start slow and short runs, then gradually build up your pace and distance. As a guide increase the distance by 10% per week. If you are running in the in warm weather bear in mind that dogs don’t sweet and can easily overheat. Carry water and give your dog the oppurtunity to get into the shade if they start to show signs. Checking your dogs pads for wear is also advised especially if you are putting in the miles on tarmac and look at a set of boots. As you are now starting to get into your running you will find carrying the lead is not always the most confortable way to run. You will then be looking for something that leaves you hands free but will still allow you control over your dog. If you are already a seasoned runner then you may want to go straight to hands free running so that you are not carrying a lead, because it may unbalance your running style. For this first step there are two options, either the Hands Free Leash or the Mikki Jogging Lead. The Hands Free Leash, and this is what I started with, is an elasticated waist belt. This adjusts to fit any size runner. The Mikki Running Lead is a wrist cuff with a coil lead, like telephone cable. Both of these leads will absorb the pull if your dog decides to start heading in a different direction but it is is not designed for constant pulling or a towing dog. For this your dog will also need a good harness. A recommended allround harness is the Ruffwear Webmaster Harness. Which leads us on to the really fun bit. Without even realising it many dog owners already Cani-cross, cross-country running with your dog. You can now take part in CaniX events at any level, whether you are a beginner in the 2.5km Have-A-Go event or competing in the 5km event. Visit www.CaniX.co.uk . The series of events run throughout the season from September to April giving you something to work towards and a way to measure your progress. Ultimately in early May there is the CaniX Neolithic Half Marathon on Salisbury Plain finishing at Stonehenge. The ultimate goal for you and your dog and an outstanding location to run a half marathon. A few tips:

    • Start slowly and build up your distance.
    • Don’t feed your dog before a run.
    • Be careful in warm weather. Dog can and will over heat easily.
    • Excessive exercise for puppies can cause joint damage.
    • If you run on country lanes train your dog to run on your right, run towards oncoming traffic.
    • Above all use common sense!
  • Welcome to The Inner Wolf Howl

    Welcome to our new blog, The Inner Wolf Howl. Here we will provide up-to-date product reviews, news on events and activities for you and your dog, places to stay. We hope you will enjoy the time here and the content we provide useful for helping you to get out and active with your dog. all at Inner Wolf

Items 21 to 30 of 30 total

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3