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The Inner Wolf Howl | Equipment reviews, Events and Activities for You and Your Dogs | Canicross | Bikejor | Camping

The Inner Wolf Howl | Equipment reviews, Events and Activities for You and Your Dogs | Canicross | Bikejor | Camping

  • There's a road, keeps on calling me! The DOGtrace X20 Dog GPS Tracker

    It's always difficult to know how your dog is going to react to different training styles. Inuk the Shepsky, German Shepherd cross Husky seemed to keep a safe distance to me and be constantly checking where I was. I crossed my fingers and hoped German Shepherd traits would override the rumours you hear about huskies wandering off. I continued to walk her off the lead, mainly down the enclosed canal tow path since I had her at 8 weeks.

    Training was confined to a small space about 20m x 7m but with an open end where she could get to the canal and road and she did know what was beyond that imaginary line due to the walks. With a firm command as she approached this line and armed with the treats in my pocket she had no interest in stepping one foot further. We'd even pop out to this spot for toilet (off the lead) and she'd come straight back in doors on cue!

    It was around 6 to 8 months I noticed a change in her behaviour. She'd always been a scavenger which drew her further afield but the instinct to chase, cats, pigeons, ducks and squirrels. As she began to understand the difference between good and bad behaviour, if she knew she'd been bad, not come back on cue, chased something and gone near a road, the husky kicked in. Friends agreed you could see it in her eyes, she's thinking 'why would I come back to be told off' it was then I realised the difference in positive and negative training techniques and different breeds (more on that another time) this happened one or two times but as I continued the daily routine she quickly forgot this behaviour in these locations.

    And so, the icing on the cake! An unfortunate sequence of events. One afternoon while at the farm where I run a business, she picked up a road kill rabbit, with meat exposed she ran off into the field with it. Surprisingly when I caught up with her she gave it up and recalled quite well ...but not too long after on a walk down a disused railway track she caught and killed another rabbit. Not uncommon I later found in many breeds! This scenario was different, every time I got close she'd pick up and run away, each time with a little less on the rabbit. When it was finally gone there was no recall, not sit, no stay, nothing. As I had before tricked her back into the lead with treats this time I called a friend and his dog. If you switch her back into play mode and the most lifts from her eyes she'd recall straight away. But each time she'd grow wise to the tricks.

    Back on the farm the draw of rabbits, and waste food had become a problem. Where I could usually have her off the lead and under control. If she stepped beyond the circle of control you'd see the most ...and then she was off. It wouldn't be a problem as I know where she goes but they don't like it on the farm so I could not continue any routine. If the doors were open she was penned in or on a tether. But this meant, at the slightest opportunity she'd be off.

    The DOGtrace X20

    DOGtrace X20There's no worse feeling than you thinking you might have lost your dog, she might have wondered to the busy road or evening someone's made off with her. All these things run through your mind during the search. When you know where she is it's different! There's some element of cornering or ushering away from danger. I'd looked at many tracking devices, all with the need for a data connection to transmit the gps and of course reliant on phone signal. All great but the locations you are most likely to be in this situation is usually remote.Armed with the Dog Trace X20 I headed down to East Head on the West Wittering Estate. I have no problem recalling here, only the farm! But I know there's rabbits in the dunes and bramble bushes so as we walk on the inland side off the peninsula she'd be off on the hunt. With the collar and handset paired and full GPS signal we set off. The handset is fairly simple with 4 buttons and a simple, hold the 2 components together to turn the collar on system. The range is up to a massive 20km but we wouldn't be getting to test that today. While she's close the handset signals this so I sent her off into the dunes for a hunt. Very accurately the device tells you the dogs direction and distance so I continued the walk her down, not looking back and not with the usual occasional recall. At times she was 80m away, out of sight but I knew exactly which bush she was patrolling

    DOGtrace X20

    The system comes with lots of other functions including beeper, fence and can even monitor up to 9 dogs. It's waterproof and for me this means sand proof which is great for down the beach.

    In my opinion, keeping you dog on the lead at times they should be able to roam is not the solution to the wandering dog problem. I managed to correct this behaviour in locations where I still had some element of control. But it's piece of mind you need in order to remain in the correct state of mind yourself to deal with the issue and train it out.

    Find out more here: http://www.innerwolf.co.uk/dogtrace-dog-gps-x20-tracker.html

  • Hurtta Summit Parka Winter Coat – Product Review

    I take my cockapoo to work with me every day, which mostly involves us hanging around a large, unheated workshop. In the Summer it’s oppressively hot, but in the winter it’s arctic levels of cold.

    So I needed a dog coat she could wear all day, every day. It therefore needed to be warm, but comfortable enough that she can nap in it during the day.

    After a bit of research and some careful measuring, I settled on the Hurtta Summit. The first thing that really hits you is the quality of the materials and construction. This is probably better made than most of my human coats.

    The coat has a thick fleece lining and a water proof top part, which really gives you the best of both worlds. There’s a flap on the back if you want to use a harness, otherwise the coat allows you to attach the lead to the collar as normal

    You fit the coat on the dog by placing the hood part over its head. You then strap the underside to the top side with a snap clasp. There’s then two further elastic hoops that hook around the dogs back legs. These keep the coat fixed and central, which means the dog can still go to the toilet as it would do normally, which was a big concern.

    Once it’s on, my dog doesn’t even really seem to notice it’s wearing it, but I’ve noticed she doesn’t shiver anymore! It’s not the cheapest dog coat you can buy, but for everyday use, it’s the best one I’ve seen. It’s durable, comfy and fully washable. If you’re after a great winter coat for an active dog, then you can’t do much better than the Hurtta Summit

    img_2785

    http://www.innerwolf.co.uk/hurtta-summit-parka-winter-coat.html

  • Great twist on the Creature Comforts series from our friends at Tilt

    Check out this video from our Friends at Tilt. Tilt were commissioned by the South Downs to produce a 'Take the Lead' campaign about responsible dog ownership. This made us chuckle! Dog walkers on the South Downs were interviewed and the voice over was added to a funny animation with a twist on the classic creature comforts sketches.

    Take the Lead from tilt on Vimeo.

  • Can someone please just work out when we’re meant to Spay our dogs?

    Two of the Inner Wolf pack puppies have just finished going through their first season and anyone who’s had to live with their dog during this time will know what a miserable few weeks of dog ownership it is. No walks off the lead, neediness, disobedience, grumpyness, escape attempts and some stained furniture – And that’s just the owner

    Both of us were advised by our breeders to wait for our dog to have at least one season before going having them neutered but now I’m wondering why? So much like my dog trying to escape my garden, I did some digging

    A good friend of mine had his puppy neutered after at only 2 months old. “wow, that’s really young” I remarked – “Well it was by a proper vet” he replied “it’s not like I took her to a back street abortion clinic!” Their vet had advised them to do it as soon as possible as a young puppy recovers much quicker.

    My dog, a nine month old Cockapoo, half way through her first season, visited our vet last week as she was struggling to wee. We were then asked by our vet why we’d chosen to wait and we were given a reasonably stern lecture about the dangers of waiting; By allowing your dog to have a first season, the chances of Mammary cancer increase by around 10%. A second and third season pushes them up to 30%. Our vet was reasonably firm that by now we should have had her spayed.

    Further online research turns up quite a lot of information about the hormones produced in the dogs adolescence that help growth of the legs, joints, plates and bladder and that by removing the uterus, your dog could suffer from growth defects, incontinence, weight gain and poor coat texture. Now, I would normally agree with a medical professional over some google search results, but the contradictions and weight of opinion on both sides is quite staggering.

    So by now, you’re probably also scratching your head and you’re as baffled as I am. I’ve ben reading a lot about this and the get them young/ wait for a while argument seems to be split evenly, although the vets do seem to be more in favour of doing it sooner. If we sit somewhere in between the two opinions, I’m going to conclude that my breeder and therefore I, am right to do what we’re doing, have one season and then go for it. My dogs first birthday present will be a large bag of Ribbies trip to the vet for a general anesthetic.

    Hopefully these three weeks of misery will be quickly forgotten and the Inner Wolf pack will continue to grow into healthy active, adventure dogs! The research continues…

  • Can someone please just work out when we’re meant to Spay our dogs?

    Two of the Inner Wolf pack puppies have just finished going through their first season and anyone who’s had to live with their dog during this time will know what a miserable few weeks of dog ownership it is. No walks off the lead, neediness, disobedience, grumpyness, escape attempts and some stained furniture – And that’s just the owner

    Both of us were advised by our breeders to wait for our dog to have at least one season before going having them neutered but now I’m wondering why? So much like my dog trying to escape my garden, I did some digging

    A good friend of mine had his puppy neutered after at only 2 months old. “wow, that’s really young” I remarked – “Well it was by a proper vet” he replied “it’s not like I took her to a back street abortion clinic!” Their vet had advised them to do it as soon as possible as a young puppy recovers much quicker.

    My dog, a nine month old Cockapoo, half way through her first season, visited our vet last week as she was struggling to wee. We were then asked by our vet why we’d chosen to wait and we were given a reasonably stern lecture about the dangers of waiting; By allowing your dog to have a first season, the chances of Mammary cancer increase by around 10%. A second and third season pushes them up to 30%. Our vet was reasonably firm that by now we should have had her spayed.

    Further online research turns up quite a lot of information about the hormones produced in the dogs adolescence that help growth of the legs, joints, plates and bladder and that by removing the uterus, your dog could suffer from growth defects, incontinence, weight gain and poor coat texture. Now, I would normally agree with a medical professional over some google search results, but the contradictions and weight of opinion on both sides is quite staggering.

    So by now, you’re probably also scratching your head and you’re as baffled as I am. I’ve ben reading a lot about this and the get them young/ wait for a while argument seems to be split evenly, although the vets do seem to be more in favour of doing it sooner. If we sit somewhere in between the two opinions, I’m going to conclude that my breeder and therefore I, am right to do what we’re doing, have one season and then go for it.  My dogs first birthday present will be a large bag of Ribbies trip to the vet for a general anesthetic.

    Hopefully these three weeks of misery will be quickly forgotten and the Inner Wolf pack will continue to grow into healthy active, adventure dogs! The research continues…

     

  • Battersea Dogs home teams up with LBC for abandoned dogs

    Unfortunately, even in 2016, abandoned dogs are still a huge problem in the UK. In partnership with London based (available nationally via digital) radio station LBC, Battersea dogs home have launched a week long campaign to help rehome some of the abandoned dogs Battersea have had to take in.

    Monday’s dog, Artu, a Husky cross came all the way from Italy, while Wednesday’s dog was an eight year old Staff, bought in as a stray by a member of the public. The dogs had a great time appearing live on air;

    https://www.facebook.com/LBC/videos/10154284173736558/

    Rehoming stray dogs is always a tricky affair, we’ve found a number of the larger rehoming centres and charities won’t allow you to adopt a dog if you have small children in the house (one place we spoke to had a lower age cut off of 13!). We can only assume that in these cases, the rehoming centres don’t want to be responsible for a dog that ultimately hurts a child, but my view would be that if you were concerned the dog might get itself into trouble, then it probably shouldn’t be rehomed anyway! Other countries, like Australia don’t seem to have such restrictions and therefore, it would appear, to have much shorter list of dogs waiting to be rehomed. Bringing a dog into a child’s life can have huge benefits to both the child and the dog. Children develop a sense of responsibility, they learn to care and they learn how to behave around other peoples dog and other animals they may meet.

    Lets home this latest campaign gets more dogs where they should be – In a caring and loving home with owners of every age, out walking, exploring and sharing adventures.

    To view Battersea’s current dogs who are looking for a home, visit https://www.battersea.org.uk

  • Hurtta Torrent Coat Review

    If it is possible to improve on excellence Hurtta have achieved it. For a number of years now the Hurtta Raincoat has easily been the most popular out of the range of coats Inner Wolf has offered. Surely we were not the only ones with a look of surprise on our faces when we heard that Hurtta were discontinuing it. That was until we got out hands on the new Hurtta Torrent Coat, the Hurtta Raincoats replacement. the reason the Raincoat was so popular was simply due to it's quality of fabric and design. Complete waterproof and very good coverage, including the underbelly, the coat kept dog dry but also made the clean-up job considerably easier post walk.

    Hurtta Torrent Coat Hurtta Torrent Coat - Running, always running
    The Hurtta Torrent still has these same features with slight changes to the shape and tailoring without compromising the coverage, but improving it with a longer neck collar. The fabric is still the same high quality waterproof and breathable Houndtex with large areas of hi-vis reflective strips making the coat highly visible to road users, and your torch, on dark walks. With more dogs wearing harnesses and the popularity of the Hurtta range of harnesses, Hurtta have included in this and all their coat range the access point on the back to allow the connection of a lead to a harness beneath the coat. The two smallest of the size range, 20cm and 25cm, have an integrated harness system. Hurtta_Summit_Parka_Raven In all we simply cannot fault this coat. The long adjustment of the chest strap ensures that the coat fits well to a good range of dog shapes including the deep chested breeds like Greyhounds and Pointers. The price ranges from £46.99 to £63.99, from 20cm in length to 90cm and in four smart colours, Fern Green, Orange Sun, Cherry and Raven. For more information and to order click here Hurtta Torrent Dog Coat >>>
    Measuring for a dog coat A quick guide to measure your dog correctly for a coat.
     

  • Easter '14 Opening TImes

    Sorry, we will be closed through the Easter Bank Holiday Weekend. Open again as usual on Tuesday 22nd. Hope you all have a great Easter and find plenty of time to get to the big outdoors with the dogs!

  • Something The Bakers Ads Don't Mention

    Why is Bakers dog food such a poor brand to feed your dog? Well the following ingredients list may explain why... E320 - has been found to be tumour-producing when fed to rats. In human studies it has been linked with urticaria, angioedema and asthma E321 - banned for use in food in Japan, Romania, Sweden, and Australia. The US has barred it from being ...used in infant foods. So bad McDonalds have voluntarily eliminated it from their products. E310 - Banned from children's foods in the US because it is thought to cause the blood disorder methemoglobinemia E172 - Banned in Germany E132 - Can cause skin sensitivity, a rash similar to nettle rash, itching, nausea, high blood pressure and breathing problems. One of the colours that the Hyperactive Children's Support Group recommends be eliminated from the diet of children. Banned in Norway. E102 - TARTRAZINE - A trial on 76 children diagnosed as hyperactive, showed that tartrazine provoked abnormal behaviour patterns in 79% of them E110 - Sunset Yellow has been found to damage kidneys and adrenals when fed to laboratory rats. It has also been found to be carcinogenic when fed to animals E104 - One of the colours that the Hyperactive Children's Support Group recommends be eliminated from the diet of children. Banned in Australia, Japan, Norway and the United States. E171 - Banned in Germany E153 - Banned as a food additive in the United States of America. Suspected as a carcinogenic agent.

  • Fitting A Dog Harness

    Fitting a harness.

    It’s not as difficult as it might seem but there a large variety of harnesses available which can make fitting a dog harness seem like a daunting task. The key is measurements. Below we have listed the types of harness that we would recommend for different activities, hopefully making it a little easier.

    When fitting a harness it is essential to take the measurements, not rely soley on ‘breed guides’, that’s why we don’t use them.

    The key measurements are the neck and the dog’s girth. It is also useful to know the dogs weight. Then depending on the type of harness you may also need the length of the dogs back.

    Activity

    Walking

    Ruffwear Webmaster, Hurtta Y-Harness, Fleece Lined Harness, EzyDog QuickFit, EzyDog Chest Plate Harness, Ezydog Convert Harness, Hurtta Outdoor Padded Active Harness

    Hiking and Trekking

    Ruffwear Webmaster, Fleece Lined Harness, Kurgo Tru-Fit, Ezydog Convert Harness, Hurtta Outdoor Padded Active Harness

    Canicross

    Nome X-Back, Howling Dog Second Skin Harness, Non-Stop Free Motion, Non-Stop Line harness, Howling Dog Tough Skin

    Bikejoring

    Nome X-Back, Howling Dog Second Skin Harness, Non-Stop Free Motion, Non-Stop Line harness, Howling Dog Tough Skin

    Scootering/Rigs

    Nome X-Back, Howling Dog Second Skin Harness, Non-Stop Free Motion, Non-Stop Line harness, Howling Dog Tough Skin

    Tracking

    Ruffwear Webmaster, Non-Stop Line harness, Howling Dog Second Skin Harness, Hurtta Y-Harness, Ezydog Convert Harness, Hurtta Outdoor Padded Active Harness

    Agility/Flyball

    Hurtta Y-Harness, Fleece Lined Harness, Non-Stop Line harness, Howling Dog Second Skin Harness,Ezydog Convert Harness, Hurtta Outdoor Padded Active Harness

    Mountain Work

    Ruffwear Webmaster, Ruffwear Double Back
    Training/No Pull Buster Dog Halter
    Car Safety Kurgo Tru-Fit, EzyDog Chestplate Harness

     

    You will also see that on the website under Dog Harnesses we have set subcategories for different activities to help make the choice easier.

    Fitting a working harness.

    This is often different than fitting a standard everyday walking harness.

    You might be surprised just how many times we hear, “What size harness do I need for a Lab?” or “What harness will fit a pointer?” Unfortunately there is no clear standard in dog sizes and also no standard in the size of equipment. So a medium harness by one manufacturer might be considerably larger that a medium in another. Also the size on the label doesn’t relate to the size of the dog. A small doesn’t mean it is for a small dog, a large for a larger dog etc. The key to getting the right size is taking the measurements.

    The main measurements you will need for fitting a harness are the neck size, this is often taken closer to the shoulders that you would when measuring for a collar. The girth, this is the measurement around the deepest part of the chest. The length of the back, from the base of the neck to the base of the tail (keeping the tape measure straight, not following the curve of the back) and the dog’s weight.

    Neck Fitting

    When fitting a working harness the neck will generally be tighter than you are used to when fitting a collar (the two finger rule does not apply) so don’t be alarmed if it feels a little more snug than expected. This ensures that the dog is taking the force on the strongest part of their shoulders and keeping the harness away from their shoulder joints. If it is too loose around the shoulder the straps will start to press on the shoulder joint itself and impinge movement becoming uncomfortable for the dog.

    If you are fitting the harness for a dog with a heavy coat or a lot of lose skin around the scruff then you will need to pull some of this through to ensure neck of the harness sits correctly on the dog.

    Length Fitting

    This can differ depending on whether you are fitting a short shoulder pull harness or a long harness. The key aspect to look at when fitting the length, if it is the longer harness like and x-back, is that the open V at the base cannot be pulled down over the dog rear and fall behind the legs. This is too long. The V or attachment point should sit just at the base of the tail.

    Girth Fitting

    This is the one that may ultimately affect your dog’s performance the most. If you don’t get this right and the harness is too tight your dog will not be able to breath well. If the dog starts to feel short of breath then this will put them in the most discomfort and ultimately they won’t perform. Also because of the way the dog moves when running then it could start to rub.

    Essentially the message here is to measure you dog well. If need be take the measurement several times and take the average. Don’t 'guess-timate'. With any working harness it needs to be comfortable for the dog. If the harness doesn’t fit properly then it will essentially discourage the dog from pulling well and changing to a well fitted harness makes a noticeable difference.

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